Comments on: Something More Than Polarization http://www.lessig.org/2011/10/something-more-than-polarization/ Blog, news, books Fri, 03 Feb 2017 16:59:00 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.8.2 By: jocbrut http://www.lessig.org/2011/10/something-more-than-polarization/#comment-10710 Sat, 28 Jun 2003 06:12:02 +0000 http://lessig.org/blog/2003/06/blogs_at_college.html#comment-10710 ok thanks for the info

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By: James Day http://www.lessig.org/2011/10/something-more-than-polarization/#comment-10709 Fri, 27 Jun 2003 19:21:54 +0000 http://lessig.org/blog/2003/06/blogs_at_college.html#comment-10709 It’s potentially interesting, were it not for the privacy policy.

That appears to permit mass privacy infringement through things like providing warrantless data on all air travellers in the US to support CAPPS2. At least some statement intent to prevent such mass privacy violation would be nice. At least for non-public entries, it would be nice to see some commitment to trying to keep them that way, instead of a commitment to disclose them on request for what is presumably any, however non-specific, claimed law enforcement purpose.

Disclosure if IP addresses is also problematic. Disclosure of the results of encrypting them with a secret key to identify identical posters wouldn’t be, nor would disclosure of raw IPs with no linking to a specific blog.

I read the privacy policy and thought “no way am I going to use this”.

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By: Dan http://www.lessig.org/2011/10/something-more-than-polarization/#comment-10708 Wed, 25 Jun 2003 20:58:21 +0000 http://lessig.org/blog/2003/06/blogs_at_college.html#comment-10708 Not to be a heckler, but what significance do you see here? That they are offering blogging as opposed to just webhosting (which at least most universities offer) or that they have a “default” content license in the event that the creators don’t license their own works differently? The former seems like a nice evolution in terms of services provided; most students would probably like to be able to do dynamic websites but the permissions offered on most multi-user Unix boxes don’t permit much; the latter seems like a decent idea but nothing revolutionary, considering that the student can always re-license it as he wishes. Am I missing something?

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