December 20, 2008  ·  Lessig

According to the Wall Street Journal, the RIAA has declared peace in the “copyright wars,” and will stop its suits against individual fileshares. This is important progress.

Above, the latest (and among the last) remixes of this story about Remix, emphasizing especially the call for peace, now.

  • Adrian Lopez

    On the other hand, the RIAA is pushing for agreements with ISPs to ave them kick off users who download music illegally.

    This may not seem as significant a penalty as an expensive lawsuit, but the more we come to depend on the Internet — for our jobs, for our interaction with government, for our interaction with business, and for every other necessary aspect of modern life — the more significant the RIAA’s push to ban users who copy music illegally becomes.

    Being cut off from the world’s most important global network after your third failed attempt at downloading a Metallica song? That’s peace? Yeah… right.

  • hm

    Agreed.
    This is hardly peace.
    This is potentially a LOT worse than the previous landscape or ridiculous lawsuits.

  • Tom Poe

    Following sent to assorted so-called editors and the authors. The WSJ contact page conveniently lists some of their editors and emails to contact them:
    Ms. McBride and Mr. Smith: “Though the industry group is reserving the right to sue people who are particularly heavy file sharers, or who ignore repeated warnings, it expects its lawsuits to decline to a trickle. The group stopped filing mass lawsuits early this fall.”

    Ray Beckerman’s web site has listed several lawsuits filed in recent days, which appears to make the above quote a bald-faced lie by both of you and your bosses at WSJ.
    Your shoddy reporting cannot be excused. Hopefully, each of us that have been subjected to your article, will do, as I am doing, and refuse to accept your “news” as anything other than paid commercials. I would expect better journalistic professionalism from an eighth grade classroom newspaper.
    Disgusted,
    Tom Poe, Charles City, Iowa

    I encourage others to send their own feelings.

  • http://www.longlonelyroad.com RainbowW

    the riaa is lying.

    they haven’t told us the truth in the past. why should we believe them now?

  • http://dftscript.blogspot.com/ Another Kevin

    As far as I can tell, the RIAA has never filed suit against file-sharers in its own name. Rather, RIAA member companies file suits, usually with many plaintiffs joined against many defendants. So the RIAA isn’t lying, exactly, quite. It’s just stating an irrelevancy in such a way as to lead the reader to a wrong conclusion.

    Scoundrels.

  • Sam I Am

    Perhaps ceasing illegal downloading that infringes on copyright is a valuable option to consider too, no? Stop that and just pay for what you take as we always did and this whole mess goes away.

  • allen

    first of all, it’s art. or at least, in concept is suppose to be. why create art if you don’t want to share it with the world. why put it out there. i can’t say all of today’s artist, but it certainly seems like most artist only care about making money and avoiding working a regular job. art should be created to express an issue, convey an emotion, share a concept, ect. whoever, it should never be used as a means to simply “make money”.

    my second point is, how many starving witters do you see out there? i can gladly go to any library and pick up any book i want. are writers going broke because people don’t have to buy books? please. every store i go into has books, even the dollar store. there are places such as Barnes and Nobles who, surprise, sell nothing but books despite the fact that anyone can get them for free and without legal consequences.

    personally i like the idea of radio head releasing their cd for free and leaving users to decide how much their music is worth. maybe artist need to start caring about their art and why they do it rather than peoples wallets.

  • http://www.coldorbit.org Etherspirit

    Working with ISPs to ban suspected copyright violators from the internet without due process is not peace.

  • AA, from Brazil

    Very nice illustrated speech. We can agree with many of the concepts, but the basic: we, the creators, cannot create and pay for the bill. – So, who should pay the bill? The bill for the democratic use of our creation? Governments, Internet providers, the manufacturers of products involved in such enormous technology? What we are watching is something that is probably leading us to the end of copyright, being ourselves professionals or amateurs. The preset CC contracts, despite its efforts, are still far away from a solution for the ones who make their (our) lives and survival from their creation. And for the almost total majority of creators – who don’t know the law or, even, basics about copyright, it lacks the presence of a lawyer. It would be very ingenuous to think that creators from this planet would know what they are (were) signing…
    The Internet use of our creations is a total confusion and a real mess. Our rights are being usurped by the infinity of explorers. A regulation of the creation usage is URGENT. Yes, we can start with the copyright law. – Why not? For example, in music, no matter what type of technology is being used, mechanical rights will be always mechanical rights (being it physical or download sales), performing rights will be always performing rights (being in a radio – internet radio, podcast, etc…, or as a background utilization on a website). As well as the above types of usages the copyright laws also contemplates synchronization, being in any type of broadcast, film, clip or Internet similar, being sharing a creation with some other author who mixes his/her creation to some existing one. And above all, there is still one of the most important conquests of copyright law: the moral right (the possibility of the author, the creator, to not accept the usage of his/her original creation once its use could corrupt its original intention.

    Who is going to pay for the bill?

  • http://www.bivia.com Ben Curtis

    Apropos of little else but the topic, “2009″ in roman numerals is “MMIX”

    Happy 2009, Larry!