Comments on: CC Labs http://www.lessig.org/2006/12/cc-labs/ Blog, news, books Thu, 12 Oct 2017 08:56:00 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.8.2 By: Max Battcher http://www.lessig.org/2006/12/cc-labs/#comment-15976 Tue, 12 Dec 2006 18:42:23 +0000 http://lessig.org/blog/2006/12/cc_labs.html#comment-15976 “I am working on a model for metadata too.
I am aiming to develop a system for generating a profile for any license. Yes Creative Commons but also the DRM ones, also GPL etc. I think this is needed because people need to be able to find information and technology which is safe regardless of who’s license is being used. I am not aiming to develop a set of licenses but a set of criteria for sorting any license. This is a work in progress and I would be happy for advice. Janet”

That sounds neat Janet. There’s a lot of prior art in this area from they way projects like SourceForge/FreshMeat notate to the CC’s RDF meta-data, etc. A useful, simple form could be extremely handy, particularly of a Microformat (microformats.org) variety that could easily be embeddable in just about any document (and just as equally for fractions of a document).

Something that I was looking for, and it certainly would be handy to see, but also points to some of the difficulties in this space would be some sort of notation for the interpretative differences between uses of even the same license. The best representation here is the GPL, which in some ways has become infamous for this dispute: The FSF and several business models support an interpretation of the GPL that implies a huge stretching/breaking of the Copyright term “derivative”. Until a court case is decided on the matter the issue will continue to come up. In a nutshell the FSF maintains that linking into a software object constitutes derivation of that software. This is almost analogous to calling a research paper a direct derivation of every other paper cited (even for supporting facts that aren’t crucial to the thesis). There’s a lot of debate on the matter back and forth (search for “static linking” and “dynamic linking” with the GPL for some idea on how thin the distinction is on all of these problems). Some GPL licensors you continually have to be frightened of litigation in mixed license situations. On the other side there are policies and exemptions promoting the freedom to link, with probably the most notable being the GNU Classpath Exception.

Anyway, good luck with your project.

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By: tacet http://www.lessig.org/2006/12/cc-labs/#comment-15975 Sun, 10 Dec 2006 20:45:45 +0000 http://lessig.org/blog/2006/12/cc_labs.html#comment-15975 I think further clarity for licenses and their selection is a great idea.
I’m sure most cc artists are more than willing to give away their art, whilst remaining open to commercial possibilities.

Physical items like t-shirts are a good example of such possibilities, I think I’m correct in saying George Lucas made something more than pocket change from the Star Wars merchandise deal ;)

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By: Janet Hawtin http://www.lessig.org/2006/12/cc-labs/#comment-15974 Sat, 09 Dec 2006 03:21:14 +0000 http://lessig.org/blog/2006/12/cc_labs.html#comment-15974 I am working on a model for metadata too.
I am aiming to develop a system for generating a profile for any license. Yes Creative Commons but also the DRM ones, also GPL etc. I think this is needed because people need to be able to find information and technology which is safe regardless of who’s license is being used. I am not aiming to develop a set of licenses but a set of criteria for sorting any license. This is a work in progress and I would be happy for advice. Janet

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By: Ka-Ping Yee http://www.lessig.org/2006/12/cc-labs/#comment-15973 Fri, 08 Dec 2006 06:54:05 +0000 http://lessig.org/blog/2006/12/cc_labs.html#comment-15973 Regarding the new licensing user interface (as far as i can tell, it’s a new user interface, not an engine): the concept is great, but the execution really needs improvement. The main visual problem is that it’s impossible to tell whether a puzzle piece is activated or deactivated, and whether a puzzle piece is clickable or unclickable. After you have seen all the variations of a piece, it becomes clear which is which, but it isn’t at all obvious just by looking at a piece on its own.

Once this is cleared up (and once the piece images are preloaded so that clicking on a piece doesn’t make it disappear for several seconds, and the hit regions are adjusted so that clicking on a piece always activates the correct piece), this will be excellent.

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