October 1, 2005  ·  Lessig

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Michael Geist
, professor of law at University of Ottawa, and editor of the BNA’s daily Internet Law News, has again done the extraordinary. After pulling together and editing an amazing collection of authors to write about the future of copyright reform in Canada, he convinced the publisher to release the book, In the Public Interest, under a Creative Commons license, and has gifted the royalties to Creative Commons. Buy the book, download the book, read the book: each will do some good. Thanks, Michael, again.

  • http://www.polisource.com Barry

    It’s beginning to seem like choosing a Creative Commons license is more a political statement and a vote for less government regulation than an open minded choice by someone who’s not anti-copyright. I don’t like that it’s seen as a charitable cause. I syndicate someone’s Creative Commons newsfeed, but I’m a little reluctant to choose such a license for anything I might create in the future because I wouldn’t want it to seem like a political statement.

    Hmmm… now that the reply window replaces the blog window, I miss not being about to see the blog without opening another window.

    And move the couch a little to the left.

  • anonymous

    Hmmm. “Gifted the royalties to Creative Commons”.

    Guess Lessig is happiest if anyone receives compensation, as long as it is not the creator.

    What a crock.

  • http://www.elitism.info/journal David

    Barry, if it makes you any happier, I’ll tell you many socialists in Europe support the Creative Commons idea, something clearly at odds with “in favour of fewer government regulations”.

  • http://stunlaw.blogspot.com David Bjorkmann Berry

    What’s really concerning though is the click-through EULA licenses on each chapter. What is this about putting law in the way of creatively sharing texts. I thought that CC wanted to get the lawyers out the way?

    eg.

    http://209.171.61.222/PublicInterest/one_3_tawfik.htm

    If this heralds a new way of using the CC licenses I think it will put people off rather than encourage people to share.

    Best

    David

  • http://www.polisource.com Barry

    I chose a LGPL licence for some software and I’m worried about the political statement I’m making there too, but it’s good to hear that there are socialists who support Creative Commons.

    Also, those Creative Commons links to see the license often lead to a page that’s temporarily down. CC needs better servers.

    If anyone knows a good right wing CC newsfeed that can be republished for a profit, let me know. I currently syndicate Christopher R. Brauchli’s column The Human Race and Other Sports but he, like most CC publishers, is liberal, and I’d like to balance things out. I’m looking for comparable quality to the noteworthy and free-for-syndication blogs listed here. Lessig’s a little too special-puropse, and I’m looking for editorial type blogs where most entries aren’t just a single paragraph describing a link.